Placemaking Metanoia

Placemaking Metanoia

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More and more, architects and planners are jumping on the band-wagon of “place” and “placemaking” as a hot new trend in sustainability. While this is good news, it also has the potential of becoming more of the same.  If we continue to see place and placemaking in human centric terms, we will engage in this movement with the same mind that got us into this mess in the first place. What is required, therefore, first and foremost is a metanoia (a fundamental change of mind) in how we view place. From a living systems view, the phenomena of place and placemaking are not just human processes but rather larger planetary processes in which we as humans have a role to serve. To gain perspective, take the Andean perspective of the process of placemaking

Ticky Tacky

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  When Malvina Reynolds sang about “little boxes on the hillside,” she was describing the monotony that is created when our homes and neighborhoods fail to reflect the essence of people in a unique place. While the song illustrates this with the image of a housing development, the same observation holds true for businesses. People intuitively react negatively to big chains that give no consideration to a local community and its distinctiveness. Many cities fight back, trying to stop the flood of commodification of their communities that box stores bring. It is often said that this fight is about losing local businesses, but it may be better said that it is about losing the “essence of place” with which local businesses are more connected. Communities are fighting valiant battles. These battles would be more effective if they focused not only on slowing or stopping the pace of commodification of their towns

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Welcome to Edge :: Regenerate

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Welcome to Edge : : Regenerate. Who are we? More details can be found on the Authors page, but basically we are professionals from business, community and economic development, education, architecture, Permaculture, and land development. We share a passionate belief that learning how to regenerate living systems—all living systems, human and otherwise—is the core imperative for the 21st Century. This imperative threads through, and gives direction to, the collaborations and dialogue that nourish our work within and across our individual disciplines. Edge is “the outer or farthest point of something”; it’s to “have an advantage,” but it’s also “the point or moment just before a marked change or event.” For Ilya Prigogine, it was the place from which whole-system change was sourced. In ecology, it’s the area where different ecosystems or communities meet. This is where the “edge effect” takes place—a much greater abundance, diversity and fecundity of life than

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